Tag Archives: blueberry

Blueberry muffins

16 Feb

The kid is obsessed with blueberries, so every time we see them on any kind of sale we buy them.  However, my spouse and I aren’t always together, which is how we ended up with something like four pounds of blueberries in our fridge this week.  They are delicious, but that’s a lot of blueberries for a voracious 16 month old.  So I googled “blueberries recipe” and the first hit was an incredibly popular recipe for blueberry muffins.  I’ve made muffins a few times before, but one time was bacon mashed potato muffins and the other times are just quick breads cooked into muffin size, rather than a specific muffin recipe.  Granted, muffins are just individual sized quick breads, but something ended up different and amazing with this one.  Probably the just-right amount of streusel topping.

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I love recipes with eggsactly one egg; it makes that egg so eggstraordinary and also makes the recipe easy to eggsecute with my eggsecutive function.

I also chose this recipe because I already had all the ingredients in my pantry, though I am running low on baking powder.  If you bake at all you probably already have the ingredients for some kind of quick bread/muffin all the time, minus some fruit (so I often go for banana).

Whisk together the dry ingredients: flour, brown sugar, salt, baking powder.  I do recommend a whisk instead of a fork so the baking powder can get well mixed in, but you do you.  Then mix the wet ingredients together right in the measuring cup: egg, oil, milk.

Make a little well in the middle of the dry ingredients, and pour the wet mixture right into the middle of it.  Stir just until all the dry ingredients are moistened and there aren’t big pockets of flour anywhere: you want to stay clumpy so the muffin is tender.

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Some people are perfectionists and want to whisk everything perfectly smooth, and they’ll throw everything else out in the clumpster.  That’s how we make muffins! 

Then fold in your blueberries.  I love very fruity muffins with just enough muffin to hold the fruit together, but your preferences may vary.  Generally when baking with fruit/chocolate chips/nuts/mix ins you want to do that at the end, after the batter is all mixed, so you don’t have secret and disgusting clumps of flour/baking soda stuck to the nooks and crannies of your mix in.

It’s almost a one bowl recipe, and would be if you didn’t make the streusel topping and just sprinkled them with sugar instead.  But I love the streusel: cut together room temperature butter, sugar, flour, and cinnamon with a fork until crumbly and streusel-looking.  This recipe makes six big muffins or twelve little ones; each got a heaping tablespoon of batter and a generous sprinkling of streusel.

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I don’t want you to misconstreusel things: those are silicon baking cups, which are like reusable cupcake liners and are awesome.

Bake em in a 400 degree oven and marvel at their beauty.  Also beware, these muffins are surprisingly heavy.  I wanted to eat two for breakfast this morning, but only made it through one and a half (kid ate the other half but didn’t like these as much as plain blueberries.  More for us!)

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We were actually so excited to eat these that I couldn’t take a picture before two were gone

20160215_214531Blueberry muffins, adapted from a ridiculously popular allrecipes recipe

1 1/2 c flour

1/2 c brown sugar + 1/4 c white sugar (or mix to your preferences; more brown = richer taste)

1/2 tsp salt

2 tsp baking powder

1/3 c vegetable oil

1/3 c milk

1 egg

1 1/3 c fresh blueberries (or whatever fruit you have)

streusel ingredients: 2 TB room-temp butter, 1/4 c sugar, 2 TB flour, 1 tsp cinnamon

Whisk together flour, sugars, salt, and baking powder.  Measure out vegetable oil in a measuring cup, then whisk an egg into it, and add enough milk to make 1 cup.  Preheat oven to 400.  Make a well in the dry ingredients and pour the liquid ingredients into it, then stir just until everything is moistened; there’ll be clumps.  Fold in the fruit so it’s well incorporated.

Use two knives or a fork and smash the butter into the sugar, flour, cinnamon for the streusel topping, until the mixture looks like big crumbs.

Heap batter into lined or oiled muffin cups, and sprinkle generously with streusel topping.

Bake at 400 for 20 minutes.  Enjoy!

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Blueberry cheesecake ice cream

6 Aug
You might eat dinner after you make this ice cream.  Make sure you leave rum for dessert!

You might eat dinner after you make this ice cream. Make sure you leave rum for dessert!

It’s summer!  Time to bust out the ice cream maker!  This ice cream is super fancy compared to the other ice creams/sorbets I’ve made (you can also just blend a melon and put it in the ice cream maker and it’ll be great).  To make any ice cream cheese cake ice cream, just toss in some softened and blended cream cheese and a sleeve of graham crackers.  That’s pretty exciting.

This recipe has two parts: first you make the cheese cake ice cream base, then add a blueberry sauce.  This is IMPORTANT: don’t just put blueberries or blended blueberries in your ice cream without cooking them fully, because then you will have little ice chunks of frozen fruit in your final product.  Not great.  With almost no tweaking, you could use this exact recipe to make any fruit here cheesecake ice cream: strawberry, raspberry, peach…

If naming conventions were more standard, a shredded would be called a word processor.

If naming conventions were more standard, a shredder would be called a word processor.  Also how great would this food processor be with a cartoon wooden spoon giving me tips about how to use it?!

The cheesecake ice cream base is easy: blend cream cheese, half and half, milk, sugar, salt, and rum (yum).  I used a food processor for this.  You want chunks of cream cheese so don’t worry about mixing it really well.  Also, cream cheese is very rich, which is why we’re using half and half here instead of cream.  You can use cream if you want.  Then toss that in the ice cream maker while you do the rest.

To everything, churn churn churn

To everything, churn churn churn

There is a season, churn churn churn.  That season is summer.  Making ice cream in winter is not something I think of doing

There is a season, churn churn churn. That season is summer. Making ice cream in winter is not something I think of doing

To light crush the graham crackers, I stuck my sleeve (unopened) into a bigger bag, and then started smashing it with the end of my French rolling pin.  Smashing it with a pot would also work.  I liked leaving it in the sleeve to minimize graham cracker crumbs flying everywhere.

I filled out a form about home ownership the other day.  Asked if I would've bought a house without granite countertops, my first thought: "that would be crushing!"

I filled out a form about home ownership the other day. Asked if I would’ve bought a house without granite countertops, my first thought: “that would be crushing!”

The blueberry sauce takes a few minutes but is worth it for the fanciness factor.  Heat up berries with water and sugar…

Man, I lowthe unripe barrys

Man, I lowthe unripe barrys

And add corn starch, lemon juice and zest, and salt.  Stir and stir and heat, and just like cranberries in cranberry sauce, eventually the blueberries will burst their blueberry-y goodness out into a tasty sweet and thick sauce.

Surely they made lots of versions of the robot in 2001: Space Odyssey.  Maybe he was even the fifth version: HAL-E.  If there were a botanist obsessed with that movie who discovered a new species of single-ovary fleshy fruit, he could name it HAL-E berry.  I bet you know whose favorite fruit that'd be.

Surely they made lots of versions of the robot in 2001: Space Odyssey. Maybe he was even the fifth version: HAL-E. If there were a botanist obsessed with that movie who discovered a new species of single-ovary fleshy fruit, he could name it HAL-E berry. I bet you know whose favorite fruit that’d be.

Sometimes I name inanimate objects and talk to them.  If I had used a pan here instead of a pot, I would've named him Peter.  The brand would've been Peter's creator, so I could call that jammy manufacturer J.M. Berry.

Sometimes I name inanimate objects and talk to them. If I had used a pan here instead of a pot, I would’ve named him Peter. The brand would’ve been Peter’s creator, so I could call that jammy manufacturer J.M. Berry.

Cool down your berry sauce as much as your patience allows (I threw it in a tupperware and stuck it in the freezer while doing other stuff), then swirl it with the churned cream cheese ice cream and add in the graham cracker pieces.

If workers at my fridge manufacturer took bets on who could mix this ice cream the best, it'd be a sw(h)irl pool

If workers at my fridge manufacturer took bets on who could mix this ice cream the best, it’d be a sw(h)irl pool

Stick the whole thing into a tupperware into the freezer.  It’s so good.

I didn’t take a picture of the final product so here’s a picture of my baby reacting the way I bet you are to this news:

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Blueberry cheesecake ice cream, adapted from Joy the Baker:

1 package cream cheese, softened

1 c milk

1 c half and half

1 c brown sugar

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp rum/bourbon/whatever you want

1 sleeve of graham crackers (not crumbs)

at least 1 c blueberries, more if you want

1/4 c sugar

1/4 c water

2 tsp corn starch

1 lemon

First, use a food processor or blender to mix the first six ingredients until mixed (it’s fine/expected that it’ll be lumpy).  Throw that in your ice cream maker.

Smash the sleeve of graham crackers into small pieces (bite size or smaller).  Chunks are fine here too.

Heat up blueberries with sugar, water, corn starch, and the juice and zest from the lemon over medium heat.  Stir occasionally, until berries have burst and sauce is thick (5-10 minutes).  Cool the sauce (put into freezer for speediness).

Carefully swirl cooled sauce into churned ice cream, then mix in graham cracker pieces.  Freeze for several hours.

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