Tag Archives: butter

Fractions are hard, or way too many brown butter cookies

8 Feb

Sometimes I have parties at my house.  I enjoy hosting people, and I especially enjoy feeding people.  There usually comes some time between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m. when there’s no more food but still plenty of people, and I get bored of my friends antsy to bake.  I threw a party to celebrate moving out, so of course at some point I stopped what I was doing and made brown butter cookies.

I bet Fall Out Boy would love these cookies.  We're going brown, brown... sugar we're going brown baking

I bet Fall Out Boy would love these cookies. We’re going brown, brown… sugar we’re going brown baking

I love brown butter with some sage leaves, tossed over gnocchi or pasta, so I wondered if brown butter cookies would work out.  I didn’t have a lot of people over, which meant I didn’t want to make 5 dozen cookies, so I decided to divide the recipe by four.  Totally reasonable.

Start by melting your butter: two cups divided by four is half a cup, or one stick.

Foam, foam on the range, where the butter and the pots play, where seldom is heard, a discouraging burn, and the skies are the ceiling all day

Foam, foam on the range, where the butter and the pots play, where seldom is heard, a discouraging burn, and the skies are the ceiling all day

It’ll foam up and then die down, and you just let it cook for a few minutes until it turns a beautiful brown.

There used to be some loose tea in this bowl, but it vacated when the butter moved in.  If I look into these patterns, can I read how tea leaves?

There used to be some loose tea in this bowl, but it vacated when the butter moved in. If I look into these patterns, can I read how tea leaves?

While the butter is browning, toast up some pecans, either on the stove in a hot pan with nothing in it (stir every thirty seconds or so) or in the oven.  I went with oven.  Takes a few minutes in either case.

Hear hear, a toast!  We didn't think P. could, but yes, P. Can!

Hear hear, a toast! We didn’t think P. could, but yes, P. Can!

Set aside about two tablespoons of the butter for icing, then mix all your ingredients except for flour together with the butter, starting with the brown sugar.

Brown butter-brown sugar.  I can't remember if I used brown eggs- guess I browned out. (This is a double entendre but not a sexual one).

Brown butter-brown sugar. I can’t remember if I used brown eggs- guess I browned out. (This is a double entendre but not a sexual one).

Then add the flour.  Here’s what I did: the original recipe called for 3 cups of flour.  I looked at it and thought, oh, 3/4.  Inexplicably, I then multiplied 3 by 3/4 to get 9/4, or 2 and a 1/4 cups of flour, which I then dumped in.

Hippies need to leave- there's way too much flour power going on here

Hippies need to leave- there’s way too much flour power going on here

“That’s weird…” I thought.  These cookies are WAY too floury to hold together.  It took me another few minutes to figure out what had gone wrong.  Frankly, I was amazed I’d done something so bone-headed.  (This is funny because there’s a really big bone in our heads, and I’d be concerned if someone didn’t have a skull.)

Of course I wasn’t going to give up on these cookies now.  So I halved the recipe and did everything again (because 1/4 + 1/2 = 3/4, a fact that I triple checked before I restarted).

2014-01-17_20-25-22_869 2014-01-17_20-33-50_279 2014-01-17_20-37-31_407 2014-01-17_20-25-04_263

Now the dough was a reasonable texture, and a dropped tablespoon at a time baked for ten minutes resulted in beautiful, buttery, brown cookies.  Mix the set aside butter (now there should be about 6 tablespoons) with some powdered sugar (I used around 3/4 cup) and a dash of vanilla, and use it to frost the cookies.  Apparently you were supposed to mix hot water in there too, which I didn’t realize until now.  Given how well I’d done earlier in the night with reading comprehension, I shouldn’t be surprised I messed up another step.

Anyways.  These cookies are super delicious and ridiculously rich and buttery.

 

2014-01-17_21-15-41_741

Brown butter cookies, recipe poorly followed but turned out great from all recipes:

To make 45 cookies

3 sticks of butter (1 and 1/2 cups)

1 1/2 cups brown sugar

1 egg

vanilla

1 tsp baking soda

1/4 tsp baking powder

2 1/4 cups flour

handful of chopped pecans (I used the rest of a bag in my freezer)

1 cup confectioners sugar

 

Melt butter and let foam and die down until it’s a rich brown color, then pour into a big bowl.  Take out 3/4 cup or so and put in a small bowl, set aside.

Preheat oven to 350, toast pecans if you want them.

Mix the butter with the brown sugar, then add the rest of the ingredients except for flour, pecans, and powdered sugar.  I like putting in a liberal amount of vanilla- maybe 1/2 TB.

Stir in the flour and pecans.  Drop onto a cookie sheet and bake for 10 minutes to get a slightly crisp outside and soft middle.

Mix the powdered sugar with the set-aside brown butter and another dash of vanilla until frosting-like.  Recipe says to add hot water, which would make it easier to spread and icing-like.  If you need more powdered sugar, do so.  If it’s too sugary, add some water.  Use to frost cooled cookies.

 

 

 

 

 

Go shortcake, it’s your birthday

4 Oct

As summer wound down (very very quickly) I thought I’d grab the last of the fresh peaches and make a lazy peach shortcake for a Sunday afternoon treat.  Now that we’re full into fall I guess this recipe isn’t as relevant, but maybe for my California family- this recipe works with any fruit.  Strawberry is the obvious choice, but any kind of berry or mix (blueberry-peach?  raspberry-mango?) will work.  Don’t be stingy with your whipped cream and you’ll be fine.

Basking in bis(cuit ma)king

Basking in bis(cuit ma)king

Biscuits are super easy.  They’re one of the first things I made when I was studying abroad and had a teeny tiny kitchen in Budapest.  We had no measuring spoons and didn’t really know how to use the oven, but we made delicious little bumps of dough that turned out great.

Oh biscuits, I'd whisk it all for you

Oh biscuits, I’d whisk it all for you

Again, you want to use a whisk or sifter here.  No one likes baking powder clumps in their baked goods.

Chip chop in the bowl

Chip chop in the bowl

The party don't stop no

The party don’t stop no

I’m used to using two knives to cut in butter, but a pastry blender would be better.  Or a food processor!

P1010346

There there, batter, everything’ll be okay. Just need a few pats (of butter)

The recipe I used called for rolling out the batter and cutting out biscuits, but why would I do that?  Clumps of dough totally work.

Step up to the plate, boys, and watch the mound- he's got a good one in there

Step up to the plate, boys, and watch the mound- he’s got a good one in there

Yeah?  Him and what army?  Oh.

Yeah? Him and what army? Oh.

While the shortcakes bake, you can cut up your fruit and sprinkle a little sugar on it to let it macerate in the fridge.

Feeling peachy!

Feeling peachy!

And then whip the cream, just as we did for the pavlova.

P1010351 P1010352 P1010353 P1010356 P1010357Remember that this takes a few minutes but the results are so worth it.

Then assemble!  I didn’t feel like doing it myself so I just put out all the ingredients for everyone to make their own.

DIY dessert

DIY dessert

Worked out pretty well!

P1010358

Peach shortcake (From David Lebovitz, but lazier)

2 c flour

2 c baking powder

1.5 TB sugar

1 stick butter

2/3 c buttermilk (I put 1 TB white vinegar in a measuring cup, then add enough milk to make it to 2/3 cup.  Let sit for a few minutes)

4 peaches

1 TB sugar

1.5 c heavy cream

1/4 c powdered sugar

Dash vanilla

First, you can cut up the peaches and throw some sugar over them for as long as you like before you start.

Mix dry ingredients for biscuits (flour, sugar, baking powder), then cut in butter using two knives until it’s the size of corn kernels (wow, nice job, David Lebovitz!)  Add the buttermilk and mix until just blended.  Knead lightly, then form into 12 small biscuits or 6 big tall ones if you like cutting them in half.  Bake at 400 for 15 minutes or until lightly browned on the edges.

For whipped cream, whip the cream for a long time, until it starts to have some volume and density to it.  Then toss in the sugar and keep whipping until it looks like whipped cream.  Add in the vanilla and whip until mixed.

Assembly: cut the big biscuits in half or layer little biscuits in a sandwich with peaches and cream.  Yumsters!

 

Flourless chocolate cake

15 Sep
Birthday boy pavlova + flourless chocolate cake!

Birthday boy pavlova + flourless chocolate cake!

It’s been done a million times and you’ve had it in all the restaurants, but it’s still so good and so easy.  Flourless chocolate cake.  Four ingredients: egg yolks, butter, chocolate chips, milk.  You should make this when you’re feeling VERY indulgent.  I paired it with the pavlova from last week for my boyfriend’s birthday, and it went quite well: the light airy pavlova with the ultra-dense gooey chocolate cake.

No ingredient picture this time because I was making it while making the pavlova and was a little overwhelmed.

Butter?  I barely know 'er!

Butter? I barely know ‘er!

Melt your butter, set aside.  Then in the same pot, melt your chocolate chips in the milk and whisk until smooth:

P1010295 P1010296

How I whisk you were here... I'd make you a cake!

How I whisk you were here… I’d make you a cake!

The recipe called for seven egg yolks but I just had the six from the pavlova.  Whatever!  Still delicious!

Ah, to be free of this yoke of unused yolks!

Ah, to be free of this yoke of unused yolks!

Aside: apparently there’s all sorts of food safety with saving leftover yolks/whites etc.  If you aren’t making two desserts at once like I did, you should check out this site with food handling tips.  Then again, that site says not to do the egg separating trick because shells can hold bacteria.  Where are you getting your eggs?!

Anyways, beat up those yolks, then alternate adding the butter and yolks to the chocolate-milk stuff, beating each time.

Beat a bit of butter in your batter.  Then do it again with yolks

Beat a bit of butter in your batter. Then do it again with yolks.

Finally throw the whole thing into a greased pan and bake for half an hour!

I had a friend in middle school named Em.  If he were here I'd say Em, pour!  Yum!  And he'd be like, Yen we aren't in a store here.

I had a friend in middle school named Em. If he were here I’d say Em, pour! Yum! And he’d be like, Yen we aren’t in a store here.

Let it cool (maybe throw it in the freezer), and top with powdered sugar and fresh fruit, or whipped cream.

P1010311

Recipe adapted from about.com I am so serious:

6 egg yolks

2 sticks butter

1 c milk

1 bag chocolate chips

Melt the butter, set aside.

Whisk the chocolate chips into the milk over medium heat, until smooth.

Add about 1/3 of the butter to the chocolate-milk and beat until mixed.  Then add 2 of the egg yolks and beat.  Alternate butter, egg, butter, egg until you’re done.

Pour into a greased dish [I used a glass 8″ pie pan] (or a springform pan lined with parchment paper if you’re fancier than me).  Bake at 350 for half an hour.  It’ll look totally uncooked in the middle; don’t even worry about it.  Take it out, let it cool, throw it in the freezer/fridge.

When ready to serve, top with powdered sugar and fresh fruit.  Serves lots of people.

Post pour Pecan Pie por Plane!

22 May

I guess I cheated a bit on the title here, since “pour” and “por” are French and Spanish for “for”.  I just couldn’t resist the alliteration!

Anyways.  Apologies for not posting this last week.  Good news, I passed my prelim I took last week, the day after making the pie this post is about!  I’m taking another one tomorrow, and if I pass it too I’ll be done with big tests for a long time (maybe forever?  But we always think that and then people go do CFAs or random things like that).

I’ve always disliked pecan pie.  It’s bitter, the pecans are too hard, and it’s too heavily goopy- feels like my teeth are slowly rotting under the viscous syrup.  And then my friend Ellie (the one who organized the conference with me) gave me a slice of pecan pie for Pi Day (when I made the chess pie).  IT WAS INCREDIBLE.  So light and creamy, and the nutty bite of pecans perfectly offsets the gooeyness of the layer below.  There’s a bit less sugar in this pie than most, and she uses light Karo syrup which I think makes a huge difference.

If you make anything from this blog, this pie is in my top three recommendations (the others being the mushroom-burnt onion pate and the 1-ingredient chocolate mousse).  It’s simple, fast, and a huge crowd pleaser (I actually had some of this pie on Monday and then made it Wednesday).

Image

Seven ingredients, I guess nine if you count EGGSactly

It’s super easy: you just whip up your eggs, and then mix in all the other ingredients.  Oh PRO TIP (a la the brownies and foil thing): IF YOU DROP A PIECE OF EGGSHELL IN YOUR DOUGH, DO NOT PANIC.  Use the big piece of eggshell to pick it up!  It’s a little bit magical, explained here: Just kidding!  I tried to google it and could not find an explanation (let me know if you know why this works).  It’s like the big piece of eggshell attracts the little pieces.

Keep calm and bake on!

Keep calm and bake on!

I purposefully dropped a teeny bit of eggshell in this picture so you could see the next one, but I’m not so great at this whole taking pictures of a white speck floating in clear goop over another white background thing.

Don't mind me, just taking a quick dip in the gene pool (the white is where DNA is, I think) [This may be a lie I'm not a scientist]

Don’t mind me, just taking a quick dip in the gene pool (the white is where DNA is, I think) [This may be a lie I’m not a scientist]

So you whip up your eggs, put in your softened butter (I just popped a stick in the microwave for ten seconds until I could poke it like this:)

James Polk was from the south, so maybe he too had pecan pie.  Maybe he too poked some butter (seems ridiculously unlikely)

James Polk was from the south, so maybe he too had pecan pie. Maybe he too poked some butter (seems ridiculously unlikely)

Literally you need a bowl and a whisk and a measuring cup:

The Q and R trains in NYC are pretty reliable, but I always wonder: can P do it?  And then it shows up and I think Yes, PECAN

The Q and R trains in NYC are pretty reliable, but I always wonder: can P do it? And then it shows up and I think Yes, PECAN

Stick it all in your premade pie crust (or make the stupid easy pie crust from the chess pie), and toss in your oven.

I wonder if sushi is super popular in the capital of North Carolina.  Cuz, yknow, RAWleigh

I wonder if sushi is super popular in the capital of North Carolina. Cuz, yknow, RAWleigh

I’m really into poking in this post: the pie is done when you gently poke the top and it springs back.

2013-05-15_18-13-57_217

So easy!  SO DELICIOUS.

On a side note, you can bring pecan pie on a plane!  I was unsure how it’d go through security, but I wrapped it in foil, stuck it in a gallon freezer ziploc bag, and put it in my backpack.  Went through great!

My friend Shira, who also dislikes pecan pie, loved this one.  So make it!  Just writing about it makes me want to make it again: maybe next week!

 

Eleanor Reeves’ Pecan Pie (from my friend Ellie):

Beat:

3 eggs

Add:

1/4 c. soft margarine (or butter)
1 c. chopped pecans
1 tsp vanilla
1 c. light karo syrup
1/2 c. sugar

Mix, then pour into:

unbaked pie shell

Bake in preheated 375 degree oven for 10 min then at 350 degrees for 50 min.

 

 

Happy pi(e) day!

14 Mar

To celebrate, I made a chess pie.  A friend told me a story behind the name: when someone asked what kind of pie it was, the answer was “oh, jus’ pie” which eventually went from ” ‘jus” to “chess”.  In either case it’s delicious and super easy.

The other thing I did to celebrate: made a slight fool of myself on public radio!  I was on The Brian Lehrer Show to talk about pi(e) day.  Turns out I’m not very good on radio (actually I just rant incomprehensibly about baking cookies) but I’m excited that I was there, and the director of MoMath was a guest at the same time!  Glen Whitney is way awesome and excellent on the radio.  I liked just listening to him and am hitting myself for not saying anything to him about how great MoMath seems and how I’m excited to see it in a few weeks on my trip to NYC.

So, chess pie: pie crust, buttermilk, butter, sugar, vanilla, cornmeal.  Easy as… oh yeah.

Another way I was incredibly disappointing: Brian Lehrer asked if I knew any jokes with baking and math.  I  had nothing to say, and then I interrupted Glen Whitney to say I had nothing to say.  Sigh.  He mentioned that if you want to make a 9″ diameter round cake, but only have square pans, you can approximate it using an 8″ square pan.  Runs a math museum and knows interesting baking facts.  Is he sing- oh right.  I have a boyfriend.  And Glen Whitney has a wife and two daughters anyway, on a completely unrelated note.

UPDATE: you can listen to the show segment here.  Embarrassment and pride.  I feel like I’m watching my little kid at a recital of some instrument that she doesn’t know.  On another note, here’s an awesome video about pi and pie,

Let’s make a pie crust, shall we?

Joke on the radio: a country boy came back from college all full of himself.  His parents asked what he'd learned, and he said "pi r squared!" To which his father replied, "any fool knows that pie are round!"

Joke on the radio: a country boy came back from college all full of himself. His parents asked what he’d learned, and he said “pi r squared!” To which his father replied, “any fool knows that pie are round!”

Usually I just buy frozen pie crusts, but I didn’t want to go to the store, so homemade it was.  This was the laziest way to do pie crust: put all the ingredients into the pie tin, stir, and then push them into a rough pie crust form with your hands.  It very quickly turns flaky and you worry there isn’t enough moisture for all the flour and sugar, but don’t.  It will work.  Trust the recipe.

Oil oil toil and trouble, oven warm and crust bubble (but not too much)

Oil oil toil and trouble, oven warm and crust bubble (but not too much)

I did a teensy bit of work and stirred the flour, salt and sugar before adding the milk and oil, but then I just plopped it around and pressed, pressed pressed for a minute.  Voila, pie crust!  Toss this guy into the oven while you make the filling.  I think the recipe said 425 for 10 minutes, but I was baking black bean burgers at the time so it got to hang out at 350 for 15.  Doesn’t matter!

If I start getting fatter, I'm gonna name my spare tire "The Crust Belt"

If I start getting fatter, I’m gonna name my spare tire “The Crust Belt”

Notice that mine isn’t that pretty.  It’s getting covered with filing anyway!  But if you do want pretty pie crusts, lay out some parchment paper under the mixed up dough, put another piece of parchment paper on top of your dough, and roll it with a rolling pin or wine bottle or hammer on top of a solid book if that’s all you’ve got.  I do like it when people crimp their crusts with a fork.  Or you can do what I did and just throw it in there.  I love this crust because it’s flaky without being too melty, and has just the right hint of salt.

Next, the filling.  Right after you throw your pie crust in the oven, put a tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice in a measuring cup.  Then add enough milk to reach however much you need.  This recipe made enough filling for a deep dish pie crust, but I did not have one of those, so I multiplied all the ingredients by 3/4 and it was perfect.  This is 1/2 a cup of vinegared milk, to replace buttermilk.

Butter your pleasure, butter your fun, that's the statement of the great scent of buttermilk (yum)

Butter your pleasure, butter your fun, that’s the statement of the great scent of buttermilk (yum)

Meanwhile, stir together your 1 and a half c sugar and 1 TB of cornmeal (that gives your pie a nice crispy texture on top, like creme brulee).

Sometimes I feel like I should apologize for being such a fork with so many forky puns.  The rest of the time I think they're sweet.

Sometimes I feel like I should apologize for being such a fork with so many forky puns. The rest of the time I think they’re sweet.

Take a minute and melt just under a stick of butter in a bowl in the microwave (literally this took 60 seconds; my butter came out of the fridge).  Then beat three eggs into that, and stir it into the “buttermilk.”  Pour that whole beautiful pale yellow mixture into your sugar.

I so wish this cup was made of POURcelain right now.  Only not because then it would probably break in the dishwasher.

I so wish this cup was made of POURcelain right now. Only not because then it would probably break in the dishwasher.  Also I love that this photo looks sort of like a giant egg.

20130313_201057

FrACTION shot! Because I had to multiply every ingredient in this bowl by 3/4.

Also, at some point, toss in a splash of vanilla.  I think sprinkling in a bit of salt wouldn’t hurt, but Southerners might be angry at me for saying that.  This pie is DELICIOUS without it.  Pour this whole mess into your crust and bake at 425 for 10 minutes, then lower the heat and bake at 300 for two episodes of TNG.  Or about an hour.  However you like to measure time the night before Pi Day.

20130313_212348

Recipe, adapted from two recipes on allrecipes: crust and pie:

For crust:

Mix together in a pie pan:

1.5 c flour

1.5 tsp sugar

1/2 tsp salt

Then pour in:

2 TB soy milk (add 1/2 tsp sugar if using regular milk)

1/2 c oil

Stir together, then pat around to make a roughly even pie crust.  Throw in the oven for 10-15 minutes at 300-350 degrees while you prepare the filling.

For filling:

Either use buttermilk, or stir 1 TB of vinegar with enough milk (cow milk this time) to make 1/2 cup.  Let sit while you do the rest.

Stir together:

1 1/2 c sugar

1 TB cornmeal

Separately, melt:

6 TB butter (2 TB less than a stick)

And beat into it:

3 eggs

1 tsp vanilla

Mix the butter and eggs with the buttermilk.  Then pour into the sugar/cornmeal and stir.  Pour into your prepared pie crust, then bake at 425 for 10 minutes.  Turn the heat down to 350 and bake for an additional 45 minutes or until custard is set.

Chocolate chip banana bread/cake

2 Mar

I’m no stranger to banana “bread,” especially chocolate chip banana bread, so I decided to finally throw up my hands and accept that this is actually cake.  Bready cake, and not quite as sweet as cake in a box cake (or cake pops cake), but still sweet chocolatey goodness anyway.

I can’t remember if I’ve mentioned this, but my smart phone got jacked while I was in Haifa so these pictures sort of suck.  They’re all taken from my netbook.

Anyways!  A non-eventful not-that-productive week at school means some cheer-me-up baking time!  Whenever we buy bananas and some of them get too ripe, we throw ’em in the freezer.  I used to use plastic baggies and cut them up before so I could just take some banana chunks for smoothies etc., but then I’d have these frozen, sometimes punctured plastic baggies when bananas already have their own packaging!

This banana is bananas, b a n a n a s

These bananas are bananas, b a n a n a s.  Gwen Stefani sure called it.

So I throw these frozen bananas into a big juice glass of water and let them sit for a few minutes.  Then the peels come right off and your bananas are ready to be mushed!  With an egg, a bit less than 1/4 c milk, 1 tsp vanilla., and 1 c of melted butter (I used the microwave for 30 seconds).

Mush, whisk, mush!  These puns sleigh me.

Mush, whisk, mush! These puns sleigh me.

As usual, you’ve got the dry ingredients in a bigger bowl: whisk together 1.5 c flour, 1.5 tsp baking soda, and 1 c sugar.  Then mix those wet ingredients into your dry.

Big bowl: Chinese and Th-oh wait.  I meant Big Bowl: wet and dry ingredients

Big bowl: Chinese and Th-oh wait. I meant Big Bowl: wet and dry ingredients

Mix in a cup of chocolate chips, then throw this guy in the oven in a greased pan for 40 minutes at 350.  Before you eat all the delicious batter (the batter is SO GOOD).

Did you guys know 'doughhead' is an idiom for someone who acts without thinking?  I tried looking up idioms with 'dough' and that came up.  Weird.

Did you guys know ‘doughhead’ is an idiom for someone who acts without thinking? I tried looking up idioms with ‘dough’ and that came up. Weird.

Meanwhile you can enjoy your eggplant sandwich and an episode of “Glee.”  Then your oven timer goes off and yum!

Yo ho ho and a plate of crumbs

Yo ho ho and a plate of crumbs

Recipe, adapted from this one on allrecipes:

Preheat oven to 350

Mix in a big bowl:

1.5 c flour

1.5 tsp baking soda

1 c white sugar

(1/4 tsp salt)

Melt:

1 stick butter (1/2 cup)

Mash in:

2 bananas (if frozen, use a bit less milk)

And whisk in:

1 egg

1 tsp vanilla

1/4 c milk (I use soy, which means use a little less sugar)

Mix dry ingredients with wet, then fold in

1 c chocolate chips

Bake in a greased 8×8 or whatever size pan for 30-40 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean.

Beware: this post contains CORNographic materials

19 Feb

Note: this draft has been sitting around for two weeks, so the collard greens last night is a lie.  The rest of the post is true though!

I made a crockpot of collard greens last night, and decided to do some bacon and cornbread to have for breakfast.  Cornbread is WAY EASY (almost as much as shortbread).

Keeping the corny jokes to a minimum

Keeping the corny jokes to a minimum

Mix together your cornmeal, flour, salt, and baking powder.

Then beat your two eggs with 1/4 c honey, 1/4 c sugar, melted stick of butter and 1 c milk.

Use egg-sactly two eggs and softened butter!

Use egg-sactly two eggs and softened butter!

Stir in the wet ingredients to the dry, and bake at 400 for half an hour.  Donezo!

Make sure you don’t overbake it or you’ll be overdry, like mine was.  SO I made stuffing instead (the next day).  Honestly, slather a slightly dry cornbread with butter and honey and you won’t miss a thing.

Tip of the post: smashing garlic.  Put your big knife flat against the unpeeled clove of garlic, so it is parallel to the ground.  Then push down with the palm of your hand, hard, right on the clove.  That’ll smash the clove and loosen the paper covering it.  You can then cook with your smashed clove, or mince it (it’s a little easier now that it’s flat).

Time to (gar)lick this clove into shape!

Time to (gar)lick this clove into shape!

So I rarely do actual recipes for non-sweet baked goods, so I’ll just tell you roughly what went in this stuffing:

Saute:

1/2 diced onion

4 cloves of garlic

in some butter + olive oil while you cut the other ingredients.  Then add

2 cut up stalks of celery

1 chopped carrot

a handful of cut up mushrooms

Sure, add some mushrooms, do whatever, I could carrot less

Sure, add some mushrooms, do whatever, I could carrot less

Cook those for awhile, then add about 1 cup of stock (animal, vegetable, mineral, whatever floats your boat) and some salt and pepper. I tossed in some parsley because it was sitting in our fridge.

Sorry, what did you say?  I couldn't quite parse-ley that.

Sorry, what did you say? I couldn’t quite parse-ley that.

Then mix in your dried, cubed leftover bread from the day(s) before, and bake the whole thing at 350 for half an hour.  Stuffing!

yum

Cornbread recipe from about.com:

Mix 1 c cornmeal, 1 c flour, 1/2 tsp salt, 1 TB baking powder.

Separately, beat 2 eggs, 1 c milk, 1 stick melted butter, 1/4 c honey, 1/4 c sugar.

Mix the dry and wet ingredients together (mix will be super lumpy), then pour into a greased pan and bake at 400 for 30 minutes.

%d bloggers like this: